Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Posted in Monthly Skinny Videos |
Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

To many buyers, a house that’s been on the market a long time must have hidden problems. And that could lead to unnecessary and endless price reductions. Luckily, even in a distressed market, there are ways to prevent roots from sprouting under the ‘for sale’ sign.

By Karen Aho of MSN Real Estate

Real-estate agent Vince Romano could have sold his client’s house in a month if not for a little paint.

The single-family house in suburban Chicago looked great, except for some graffiti on the walls in the two teenagers’ rooms and in the basement. The homeowner wasn’t stupid. She’d taken good care of the home and knew buyers could easily see past a little spray paint. Except she was wrong.

“It looks phenomenal online. I had 17 or 18 showings in the first two months,” Romano recalls. But buyers — and often it’s subconscious — actually aren’t good at overlooking even superficial flaws, particularly if those flaws so boldly announce they’ll need a redo.

“Buyers don’t want to do that,” Romano says. “There are homes that are decked out to the nines. Maybe this home isn’t ready, but the one down the street is.”

In the end, this seller not only lost time, she lost big in the math. Had she listened to her agent and spent the $1,200 to repaint, Romano is certain he could have sold the home quickly for its $350,000 asking price. As it is, he’ll likely fetch $310,000, and only after several months of viewings.

Read The Full Article Here

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Housing isn’t just housing. That may have a strange ring to it. But housing includes building, inspecting, remodeling, lending, refinancing, furnishing and a host of other functions tied to the physical space of home. Each of these functions is tied to job growth and interest rates, and each has seen some spectacular highs and lows over the past eight years. There has been a recent sense of stability brewing in all of housing. Here’s to making the most of it.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending July 13:

• New Listings increased 25.1% to 1,921
• Pending Sales increased 26.5% to 1,352
• Inventory decreased 15.6% to 15,390

For the month of June:

• Median Sales Price increased 17.5% to $210,000
• Days on Market decreased 34.5% to 74
• Percent of Original List Price Received increased 2.5% to 97.5%
• Months Supply of Inventory decreased 25.0% to 3.6

 

Click Here to View Full Weekly Activity Report

Posted in Weekly Market Activity Reports |
Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Housing isn’t just housing. That may have a strange ring to it. But housing includes building, inspecting, remodeling, lending, refinancing, furnishing and a host of other functions tied to the physical space of home. Each of these functions is tied to job growth and interest rates, and each has seen some spectacular highs and lows over the past eight years. There has been a recent sense of stability brewing in all of housing. Here’s to making the most of it.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending July 13:

  • New Listings increased 25.1% to 1,921
  • Pending Sales increased 26.5% to 1,352
  • Inventory decreased 15.6% to 15,390

For the month of June:

  • Median Sales Price increased 17.5% to $210,000
  • Days on Market decreased 34.5% to 74
  • Percent of Original List Price Received increased 2.5% to 97.5%
  • Months Supply of Inventory decreased 25.0% to 3.6

Click here for the full Weekly Market Activity Report.From The Skinny.

Posted in Weekly Report |
Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

By: Jan Soults Walker

Sprucing up your porch is more than a cosmetic upgrade — it’ll boost your curb appeal and help preserve the value of your home. As a bonus, you’ll even get some neighborhood bragging rights. Here are five simple porch pick-me-ups, each costing less than $500.

1. Adding architectural pizzazz

Sweeten your porch’s appearance with a wide variety of architectural trim pieces in weather-resistant wood or low-maintenance synthetics (PVC or polyurethane). They’re readily available at home improvement centers.

Most porch trim pieces install with nails or screws and require basic tools and moderate do-it-yourself skills. Or, hire a handyman for a few hours at $30-$60 an hour.

• Add decorative brackets (starting at $20 each) where support posts meet the ceiling.

• Span the space above porch stairs with a fancy fretwork spandrel ($200 for 6 feet).

• Shapely corbels ($30 and up) lend charm under the eaves.

2. Painting the floor

You’re walking on sunshine when you splash color on a porch floor. Use good-quality exterior paint made for porch floors ($30-$45 per gallon) and follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for prepping the surface so the paint won’t peel.

Read The Full Article Here

User Registration

Forgot Password?
Back To Login

Enter E-mail: