Monday, April 30th, 2012

 

By Tara Nelson

One of the first things many homebuyers look for are the unmistakable signs of something called ‘pride of ownership.’ As a whole, it’s a relatively intangible concept: there are just homes that have it – reeking of their owners’ love and meticulous care for the property — and homes that, well, don’t.

I’ve watched firsthand as buyers who like a cute home that is in generally good shape literally talk themselves into looking at a more homes once they start to notice one rickety gate, which snowballed into a nitpicky laundry list of little, tiny fixes the seller had left undone. The challenge is that between deciding whether and when to sell, staging, interviewing agents and determining a list price, it can be tempting for homeowners to fall into the trap of deferring maintenance on a home they might sell soon.

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Monday, April 30th, 2012

 

By Tara Nelson

My doctor recently confided in me that physicians have a golden rule when it comes to gettingan accurate estimate of how much alcohol their patients drink on a daily basis. They take whatever number of drinks you enter on the patient information form, then multiply it by a factor of three!

While comedic (if slightly troubling), this rule is not that dissimilar from how home buyers approach the art and science of translating home sale listing-speak into what they think is a more accurate understanding of the property’s characteristics and condition.

Just as property staging creates a somewhat contrived scenario buyers can imagine their own families taking part in, property listing descriptions have evolved into a sort of verbal staging exercise where sellers and agents may create an artificial‘scenario’ that belies the true state of the property. Fortunately for savvy sellers, there’s another parallel between physical and verbal home staging: it’s all about the edit.

Removing well-intentioned but counterproductive verbal clutter from your listing is simple, but not easy. It starts with understanding what buyers take away from your words vs. what you truly meant or intended to convey. Here, to start building that understanding, are four common areas of big-time disconnects between what sellers say and what buyers hear.

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Monday, April 30th, 2012

 

By Tara Nelson

My doctor recently confided in me that physicians have a golden rule when it comes to gettingan accurate estimate of how much alcohol their patients drink on a daily basis. They take whatever number of drinks you enter on the patient information form, then multiply it by a factor of three!

While comedic (if slightly troubling), this rule is not that dissimilar from how home buyers approach the art and science of translating home sale listing-speak into what they think is a more accurate understanding of the property’s characteristics and condition.

Just as property staging creates a somewhat contrived scenario buyers can imagine their own families taking part in, property listing descriptions have evolved into a sort of verbal staging exercise where sellers and agents may create an artificial‘scenario’ that belies the true state of the property. Fortunately for savvy sellers, there’s another parallel between physical and verbal home staging: it’s all about the edit.

Removing well-intentioned but counterproductive verbal clutter from your listing is simple, but not easy. It starts with understanding what buyers take away from your words vs. what you truly meant or intended to convey. Here, to start building that understanding, are four common areas of big-time disconnects between what sellers say and what buyers hear.

Click Here For More

Monday, April 30th, 2012

 

Closing on a house can be joyful or horrific. Follow this advice for a smooth settlement.

By Polyana da Costa of Bankrate.com

You finally found the house of your dreams. You signed a contract and got approved for a mortgage. You’ve even hired the movers. Now comes the most important part: the closing.

In an ideal world, closing should be a mere formality, where homebuyer and seller sign on the dotted lines, exchange checks for the keys and shake hands. But this isn’t an ideal world, which means that if you and the professionals you hired don’t prepare, your closing could be a disaster.

Here are six tips for ensuring your closing goes smoothly.

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Monday, April 30th, 2012

 

Closing on a house can be joyful or horrific. Follow this advice for a smooth settlement.

By Polyana da Costa of Bankrate.com

You finally found the house of your dreams. You signed a contract and got approved for a mortgage. You’ve even hired the movers. Now comes the most important part: the closing.

In an ideal world, closing should be a mere formality, where homebuyer and seller sign on the dotted lines, exchange checks for the keys and shake hands. But this isn’t an ideal world, which means that if you and the professionals you hired don’t prepare, your closing could be a disaster.

Here are six tips for ensuring your closing goes smoothly.

Click Here For More